Archive for the ‘Toad’ Category

X-Man #3

February 8, 2015

X-Man 03Jeph Loeb // Steve Skroce
May 1995
*

All-combat issue: a troupe of uglies & a squad of assassins kill each other to control this ‘verse’s Cable analog. Like many ’90s comics, X-Man is so melodramatic it’s silly. Its emotions are histrionic, its action is mock-tough proclamations. But just try to describe the protag’s character? Nada.

last issue: X-Man #2
next issue: X-Man #4

also indexed for May ’95
The Amazing X-Men #3 of 4
The Astonishing X-Men #3 of 4
Factor X #3 of 4
Gambit and the X-Ternals #3 of 4
Generation Next #3 of 4
Weapon X #3 of 4
X-Calibre #3 of 4
X-Universe #1 of 2

X-Man #2

February 7, 2015

X-Man 02Jeph Loeb // Steve Skroce
April 1995
*

As X-Man tests the limits of his psi-power, he’s torn btw two mentors: tough-love Forge & indulgent Mr. Sinister. To fill out Middle America in this dystopia, Loeb exploits Holocaust iconography like trains of human cargo & charnelhouse experiments. Skroce’s 4 inkers undercut that w/ blank locales.

last issue: X-Man #1
next issue: X-Man #3

also indexed for Apr. ’95
The Amazing X-Men #2 of 4
The Astonishing X-Men #2 of 4
Factor X #2 of 4
Gambit and the X-Ternals #2 of 4
Generation Next #2 of 4
Weapon X #2 of 4
X-Calibre #2 of 4

X-Man #1

February 6, 2015

X-Man 01Jeph Loeb // Steve Skroce
March 1995
**

Cable’s iteration in this alt-dystopia is a teen mutant messiah unaware of his birthright. Conceptually, X-Man goes further than any other mag in the Age of Apoc metaseries; in execution, it’s one cliché after another. Skroce seesaws btw ugly, Image-like posturing & Quesada’s doe-eyed influence.

continued from X-Men: Alpha #1 of 1
next issue: X-Man #2

also indexed for Mar. ’95
The Amazing X-Men #1 of 4
The Astonishing X-Men #1 of 4
Factor X #1 of 4
Gambit and the X-Ternals #1 of 4
Generation Next #1 of 4
Weapon X #1 of 4
X-Calibre #1 of 4
X-Men: Chronicles #1 of 2

New X-Men #150

December 5, 2012

Grant Morrison // Phil Jimenez
February 2004
***
A great cover! Magneto, humiliated, zaps the resurrected Phoenix w/ a touch & rips a hole in spacetime. Is Mags Xorn or visa-versa? It’s ambiguous but neither option feels plausible. Take the former as read—it’s a stronger theme. Zealotry & violence (by Bin Laden or Bush) is a failed philosophy.
[last issue: New X-Men #149]
[next issue: New X-Men #151]

New X-Men #149

December 4, 2012

Grant Morrison // Phil Jimenez
January 2004
****

Tho’ Morrison probed Magneto’s X-role better in the Kid Omega arc; here he argues that the original Silver Age supervillain isn’t a radical, he’s a self-loathing reactionary. On another level, GM brings Beak’s arc to a scruffy head, as the youth stands up to the terrorist & joins the X-revolution.

last issue: New X-Men #148
next issue: New X-Men #150

also indexed for Jan. ’04
Alias #28

New X-Men #148

December 3, 2012

Grant Morrison // Phil Jimenez
December 2003
***

A hurried issue in a compressed climax: this isn’t Morrison at his best. Logan & Jean piece a plot together from sketchy evidence & debatable retcons to the previous 2½ years of comics. But one nice bit of drama has Wolvie stab Jean in a mercy-kill; she then resurrects as they plunge into the sun!

last issue: New X-Men #147
next issue: New X-Men #149

also indexed for Dec. ’03
Alias #27
Avengers/JLA #4 of 4

New X-Men #147

December 2, 2012

Grant Morrison // Phil Jimenez
late November 2003
***

After destroying NYC & the X-Men, a drug-addled Magneto’s theatrical histrionics fail to inspire mutant revolution. A fascinating failure, Morrison’s Mags ignores Claremont’s, reckoning w/ McKellen’s movie perf & Bin Laden’s real-life evil, but most of all with Stan Lee’s original raving nut.

last issue: New X-Men #146
next issue: New X-Men #148

also indexed for Nov. ’03
Alias #26
JLA/Avengers #3 of 4
New X-Men #146

New X-Men #132

November 17, 2012

Grant Morrison // Phil Jimenez
November 2002
****
Children of the late Magneto visit the toxic site of the Genoshan Sentinel massacre. Quicksilver & Toad erect a statue, while Polaris unearths a blackbox magno-recording of her father’s final words. Comic book allegory supplies the necessary distance for a respectful memorial to the 9/11 attacks.
[last issue: New X-Men #131]
[next issue: New X-Men #133]

The X-Men #11

May 23, 2010

Stan Lee // Jack Kirby
May 1965
**
Five of the first 10 issues had the X-Men competing w/ the Brotherhood to recruit mutants, a formula that’s quickly become rote (neither team added 1 member). So Stan & Jack jettison the plot-engine in this perfunctory encounter w/ a god-like alien who grabs Magneto for scientific study off-planet.
[last issue: The X-Men #10]
[next issue: The X-Men #12]

The X-Men #7

May 19, 2010

Stan Lee // Jack Kirby
September 1964
***
After running bi-monthly for a year, The X-Men celebrates by presenting its teens w/ diplomas. Prof X bows out, leaving behind a marvelous piece of  Kirbytech: Cerebro, a mutant detector. And happily, before yet another brawl w/ Magneto & the Blob, the gang visits a kooky coffeeshop in the Village.
[last issue: The X-Men #6]
[next issue: The X-Men #8]

The X-Men #6

May 18, 2010

Stan Lee // Jack Kirby
July 1964
**
Lee indulges his hobby of cross-title fertilization w/ The X-Men‘s first guest-star: Namor, the original anti-hero. He’s the focus of the mutant recruitment competition btw. Prof X & Magneto. Buoying a lackluster issue, he characteristically thrashes both sides before stalking back to Atlantis.
[last issue: The X-Men #5]
[next issue: The X-Men #7]

The X-Men #4

May 16, 2010

Stan Lee // Jack Kirby
March 1964
****
Stan’n’Jack finally find a peg to hang this book on: the kids clash w/ a rival team, the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants. It’s led by Magneto, but the real draw is a pair of morally ambiguous siblings who follow Mags cuz he rescued them from an anti-mutant mob in Europe (a coded nod to the Holocaust?).
[last issue: The X-Men #3]
[next issue: The X-Men #5]